JAM Press

 

NEW BOOKS

 

Advances in Rasch Measurement, Volume Two - edited by Nathaniel J. S. Brown, Brent Duckor, Karen Draney, and Mark Wilson - Price to be determined - Hard Cover (ISBN 978-0-9755351-8-1), Soft Cover (ISBN 978-0-9755351-9-8)

2011 - 457 pages. This book is now available.
Advances in Rasch Measurement, Volume Two, is the second in a series of volumes that will include exemplary psychometric work conducted within the framework of Rasch measurement theory. Manuscripts for this volume have been selected from papers presented at the Twelvth International Objective Measurement Workshops (IOMW), held in Berkeley in April of 2006. The manuscripts reflect both practical and theoretical advances in Rasch measurement. This series continues the tradition of edited volumes entitled Objective Measurement: Theory Into Practice.
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• Bringing Human, Social, and Natural Capital to Life: Practical Consequences and Opportunities - William P. Fisher, Jr.;
• From Model to Measurement with Dichotomous Items - Don Burdick, A. Jackson Stenner, and Andrew Kyngdon;
• Measuring Measuring: Towards a Theory of Proficiency with the Constructing Measures Framework - Brent Duckor, Karen Draney, and Mark Wilson;
• Predicting Responses from Rasch Measures - John M. Linacre;
• Random Parameter Structure and the Testlet Model: Extension of the Rasch Testlet Model - Insu Paek, Haniza Yon, Mark Wilson, and Taehoon Kang;
• Estimating Tests Including Subtests - Steffen Brandt;
• The Construction and Implementation of User-Defined Fit tests for Use with Marginal Maximum Likelihood Estimation and Generalized Item Response Models - Raymond J. Adams and Margaret Wu;
• The Efficacy of Link Items in the Construction of a Numeracy Achievement Scale from Kindergarten to Year 6 - Juho Looveer and Joanne Mulligan;
• Rasch Model’s Contributions to the Study of Items and Item Response Scales Formulation in Opinion/Perception Questionnaires - Jean-Guy Blais, Julie Grondin, Nathalie Loye, and Gilles Raiche;
• On the Factor Structure of Standardized Achievement Tests - Tim W. Gaffey, Robert Cudeck, Emilio Ferrer, and Keith F. Widaman;
• Optimizing the Compatibility between Rating Scales and Measures of Productive Second Language Competence - Christopher Weaver;
• Assessment of English Language Development: A Validity Study of District Initiative - Juan D. Sanchez;
• Using FACETS to Inform Decisions on Staff Development and Remuneration: A Case Study of Student Rating of Teaching Effectiveness Survey - Nuraihan Mat Dayd and Noor Lide Abu Kassim;
• Using Guttman’s Mapping Sentences and Many Facet Rasch Measurement Theory to Develop an Instrument that Examines the Grading Philosophies of Teachers - Jennifer Randall and George Engelhard, Jr.;
• Measure for Measure: Curriculum Requirements and Children’s Achievement in Music Education - Trevor G. Bond and Marie Bond;
• Development of a Multidimensional Measure of Academic Engagement - Kyra Caspary and Maria Veronica Santelice;
• Rasch Family Models in e-Learning: Analyzing Architectural Sketching with a Digital Pen - Kathleen Scalise, Nancy Yen-wen Chang and Margas Osku;
• Using Item Response Modeling Methods to Test Theory Related to Human Performance - Diane D. Allen;
• Sources of Self-efficacy Belief: Development and Validation of Two Scales - Ou Lydia Liu and Mark Wilson.

 

A list of chapter titles and authors for Advances in Rasch Measurement, Volume Two, with a convienent order form, is available in a printable pdf file. This file can be accessed by clicking on the highlighted ARM, V2 Contents / Order Form below.

ARM, V2 Contents / Order Form

Advances in Rasch Measurement, Volume One - edited by Mary L. Garner, George Engelhard, Jr., William P. Fisher, Jr., and Mark Wilson - $69 Hard Cover (ISBN 978-1-934116-06-7), $57 Soft Cover (ISBN 978-1-934116-07-4)

2010 - 622 pages. This book is now available.
Advances in Rasch Measurement, Volume One, is the first in a series of volumes that will include exemplary psychometric work conducted within the framework of Rasch measurement theory. Manuscripts for this volume have been selected from papers presented at the Tenth and Eleventh International Objective Measurement Workshops (IOMW), held in New Orleans in April of 2000 and April of 2002. The manuscripts reflect both practical and theoretical advances in Rasch measurement. This series continues the tradition of edited volumes entitled Objective Measurement: Theory Into Practice. The titles and authors of the twenty-seven chapters are as follows: 
• The Rasch Model and Additive Conjoint Measurement - Van A. Newby, Gregory R. Conner, Christopher P. Grant, and C. Victor Bunderson;
• Reducible or Irreducible? Mathematical Reasoning and the Ontological Method - William P. Fisher, Jr.;
• Using Paired Comparison Matrices to Estimate Parameters of the Partial Credit Rasch Measurement Model for Rater-Mediated Assessments - Mary L. Garner and George Engelhard, Jr.;
• A Family Approach to Assessing Fit in Rasch Measurement - Richard M. Smith and Christie Plackner;
• Plausible Values: How to Deal with Their Limitations - Christian Monseur and Raymond Adams;
• The Practical Application of Optimal Appropriateness Measurement on Empirical Data Using Rasch Models - Iasonas Lamprianou;
• Considerations About A Posteriori Estimation in Adaptive Testing: Adaptive A Priori, Adaptive Correction for Bias, and Adaptive Integration Interval - Giles Raiche and Jean-Guy Blias;
• Features of the Sampling Distribution of the Ability Estimate in Computerized Adaptive Testing According to Two Stopping Rules - Jean-Guy Blais and Giles Raiche;
• Local Independence and Residual Covariance: A Study of Olympic Figure Skating Ratings - John M. Linacre;
• Thinking About Thinking - Thinking About Measurement: A Rasch Analysis of Recursive Thinking - Ulrich Muller and Willis F. Overton;
• Using Adjusted GPA and Adjusted Course Difficulty Measures to Evaluate Differential Grading Practices in College - Dina Bassiri and E. Matthew Schulz;
• Constructing One Scale to Describe Two Statewide Exams - Insu Paek, Deborah G. Peres, and Mark Wilson;
• Development of Scales Relating to Professional Development of Community College Administrators - Edward W. Wolfe and Kim E. VanDerLinden;
• An Application of the Multidimensional Random Coefficients Multinominal Logit Model to Evaluating Cognitive Models of Reasoning in Genetics - Edward W. Wolfe, Daniel Hickey, and Ann C. H. Kindfield;
• Mapping Multiple Dimensions of Student Learning: The GradeMap Program - Cathleen A. Kennedy and Karen Draney;
• A Comparative Analysis of the Ratings in Performance Assessment using Generalizability Theory and Many-Facet Rasch Measurement - Sungsook C. Kim and Mark Wilson;
• Reliability of Performance Examinations: Revisited - Mary E. Lunz and John M. Linacre;
• Comparison of Single- and Double-Assessor Scoring Designs for the Assessment of Accomplished Teaching - George Engelhard, Jr. and Carol Myford;
• Exploring Differential Item Functioning (DIF) with the Rasch Model: A Comparison of Gender Differences on Eighth Grade Science Items in the United States and Canada - Tasha Calvert Babiar;
• Using Classical and Modern Measurement Theories to Explore Rater, Domain, and Gender Influences on Student Writing Ability - Ismail S. Gyagenda and George Engelhard, Jr.;
• Multidimensional Models in a Developmental Context - Yiyu Xie and Theo L. Dawson;
• Developing a Domain Theory - C. Victor Bunderson;
• Towards a Domain Theory in English as a Second Language - Diane Strong-Krause;
• The Role of Design Experiments and Invariant Measurement Scales in the Development of Domain Theories - C. Victor Bunderson and Van Newby;
• Children’s Understanding of Area Concepts: Development, Curriculum and Educational Achievement - Trevor G. Bond and Kellie Parkinson;
• Comparing Decalage and Development with Cognitive Development Tests - Trevor G. Bond;
• Concrete, Abstract, Formal and Systematic Operations as Observed in a Piagetian Balance-beam Task Series - Theo L. Dawson, Eric A. Goodheart, Karen Draney, Mark Wilson, and Michael L. Commons.

 

A list of chapter titles and authors for Advances in Rasch Measurement, Volume One, with a convienent order form, is available in a printable pdf file. This file can be accessed by clicking on the highlighted ARM, V1 Contents / Order Form below.

ARM, V1 Contents / Order Form

Criterion Referenced Testing: Practice Analysis to Score Reporting Using Rasch Measurement - edited by Everett V. Smith, Jr. and Gregory E. Stone - $69 Hard Cover (ISBN 978-1-934116-04-3), $57 Soft Cover (ISBN 978-1-934116-05-0)

2009 - 568 pages. This book is now available.
The impetus behind Criterion-Reference Testing: Practice Analysis to Score Reporting Using Rasch Measurement stems from years of consulting with organizations involved in criterion-reference testing (CRT), specifically those in licensure and certification. When contacted by an organization, one of the first activities we would engage in is a review of their technical reports. In almost every instance, these 'technical' reports were far from adequate. Most failed to address criteria set forth in the Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing (AERA, APA, and NCME, 1999). The details (or lack thereof) provided were often so poor that replication of the results was nearly impossible. And when methods were provided, they were often incomplete. Years of these experiences had led us to be incredibly disappointed in the services being provided to many of these organizations. As a result, both editors, initially independent of each other, set out to put together a book to address what we perceived as a gap between what organizations should expect and what psychometricians should provide when using Rasch models in CRT. Gregory's focus was a book on Rasch based standard setting methods. Everett's goal was a book encompassing applications of Rasch measurement that could be used throughout the test development, analysis, and reporting phases for CRT. The result is this book, covering how Rasch models can be used throughout the CRT process with an emphasis on standard setting methodologies. In addition to the ten chapters on standard setting, this book demonstrates how Rasch models can be used for the analysis of job/practice data; item and rater analysis; differential item functioning; horizontal, vertical, multi-facet, and pre-equating; computer adaptive testing; estimating decision/classification consistency; and score reporting. Based on our past experiences, we hoped to target three populations with this book. First, we address this volume to the organizations responsible for testing. In many instances these organizations did not know what to expect in a technical report. This book provides these organizations with multiple examples of the types of analyses they should expect from their psychometric provider(s) when using Rasch measurement models to support the criteria in the Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing. Second are the psychometric providers. This book will provide guidelines, examples, and ideas on how to apply Rasch based methods to issues found in CRT. Third, are graduate students studying psychometrics. This book could be used in a psychometrics course or in a course specifically devoted to large scale testing in conjunction with more broad-based textbooks covering traditional and IRT applications in CRT. The titles and authors of the twenty-four chapters are as follows: 
• Applications of Rasch Measurement to Job Analysis Data and the Translation into Content Weights - Ning Wang;
• Distractors with Information in Multiple Choice Items: A Rationale Based on the Rasch Model - David Andrich and Irene Styles;
• Item and Rater Analysis of Constructed Response Items via the Multi-Faceted Rasch Model - Edward W. Wolfe;
• Assessment of Differential Item Functioning - Wen-Chung Wang;
• Transitioning from Paper-and-Pencil to Computer-Based Testing: Examining Stability of the Rasch Latent Trait across Gender and Ethnicity - Do-Hong Kim and Huynh Huynh;
• Introduction to the Rasch Family of Standard Setting Methods - Gregory Ethan Stone;
• Psychometric Aspects of Item Mapping for Criterion-Referenced Interpretation and Bookmark Standard Setting - Huynh Huynh;
• Converging on the Tipping Point: A Diagnostic Methodology for Standard Setting - John A. Stahl and Kirk A. Becker;
• A Mapmark Method of Standard Setting as Implemented for the National Assessment Governing Board - E. Matthew Schulz and Howard C. Mitzel;
• Setting Passing Standards for Licensure and Certification Examinations: An Item Mapping Procedure - Ning Wang;
• Standard Setting with Dichotomous and Constructed Response Items: Some Rasch Model Approaches - Robert G. MacCann;
• Selecting Cut Scores with a Composite of Item Types: The Construct Mapping Procedure - Karen Draney and Mark Wilson;
• Objective Standard-Setting for Judge-Mediated Examinations - Gregory Ethan Stone;
• Evaluating the Judgments of Standard-Setting Panelists using Rasch Measurement Theory - George Engelhard, Jr.;
• The Mastery Level Judgment Consistency Rate of a Rasch Model Based Standard Setting Method for Classroom Achievement Tests - Sun-Geun Baek and In Hee Choi;
• Equating Designs and Procedures Used in Rasch Scaling - Gary Skaggs and Edward W. Wolfe;
• Tools for Measuring Academic Growth - G. Gage Kingsbury, Martha McCall, and Carl Hauser;
• Developing Examinations that use Equal Raw Scores for Cut Scores - Andrew Swanlund and Everett Smith;
• A Comparison between Robust z and 0.3-Logit Difference Procedures in Assessing Stability of Linking Items for the Rasch Model - Huynh Huynh and Anita Rawls;
• Equating of Multi-Facet Tests Across Administrations - Mary Lunz and Surintorn Suanthong;
• Computerized Adaptive Testing - Ying Cheng and Leslie Keng;
• The ISR: Intelligent Student Reports - Ronald Mead;
• Estimation of Decision Consistency Indices for Complex Assessments: Model Based Approaches - Matthew Stearns and Richard M. Smith;
• Deriving Proficiency Scales from Performance Indicators Using the Rasch Model - Jean-Guy Blais, Michel D. Laurier, and Christian Rousseau.

 

A list of chapter titles and authors for Criterion Referenced Testing: Practice Analysis to Score Reporting Using Rasch Measurement, with a convienent order form, is available in a printable pdf file. This file can be accessed by clicking on the highlighted CRT Contents / Order Form below.

CRT Contents / Order Form

CURRENTLY AVAILABLE BOOKS

 

Rasch Measurement: Advanced and Specialized Applications - edited by Everett Smith and Richard Smith - $ 63 Hard Cover (ISBN 978-0-9755351-6-5), $51 Soft Cover (ISBN 978-0-9755351-7-2)

2007 - 470 pages. This book is available.
The chapters in this book were compiled from the Understand Rasch Measurement series in the Journal of Applied Measurement and from a special issue of the Journal of Applied Measurement on multilevel measurement models guest edited by Natasha Beretvas and Akihito Kamata. To the degree possible, we have attempted to make these topics user friendly by providing a tutorial oriented perspective designed to make these models more accessible to researchers. Screenshot and control files are provided for several of the applications. The two major areas addressed are: Advanced and Specialized Applications of Rasch Models and Multilevel Measurement Rasch Models. Below you will find a listing of chapters and authors. 

 

Part I. Advanced and Specialized Applications

 

• Multicomponent latent trait models for complex tasks by Susan Embretson, Georgia Institute of Technology and Xiangdon Yang, University of Kansas
• Application of the Saltus model for developmental stages by Karen L Draney, University of California Berkely
• Using Rasch models to evaluate the hierachical complexity of developmental tasks by Michael Lamport Commons, Harvard Medical School
• Rasch analysis of rank-ordered data by John Michael Linacre, University of the Sunshine Coast, Australia
• Using paired comparisons to create the semantic construct of frequency by Thomas R. O’Neill, National Council of State Boards of Nursing, Inc.
• The relationship between the Rating Scale and Partial Credit Model and the implication of disordered thresholds of the Rasch model for polytomous responses by Guanzhong Luo, Hong Kong Examination and Assessment Authority
• The Mixed-Rasch Model: An example for analyzing the meaning of response latencies in a personality questionnaire by Michaela M Wagner-Menghin University of Vienna
• Application of the ordered partition model with multiple true-false assessments by Everett V. Smith Jr., University of Illinois at Chicago
• Specialized topics with rating scale data by John Michael Linacre, University of the Sunshine Coast, Australia
• Construction and validation of rating scales by Ed Wolfe, Virginia Tech University and Everett Smith, University of Illinois at Chicago
• Computer adaptive testing with rating scales by Rense Lange, Illinois State Board of Education

 

Part II. Multi-level Measurement Rasch Models (guest editors Natasha Beretvas, University of Texas at Austin and Akihito Kamata, Florida State University)
• An introduction to the multilevel measurement model by S. Natasha Beretvas, University of Texas at Austin and Akihito Kamata, Florida State University
• Some links between classical and modern test theory via the two-level HGLM by Yasuo Miyazaki, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
• Demonstration of software programs for estimating multilevel measurement model parameters by J. Kyle Roberts and Rich Herrington, University of North Texas
Test equating in the presence of DIF by Kwang-lee Chu, Research and Evaluation Consultant and Akihito Kamata, Florida State University
• Mixed model estimation methods for item response models by Frank Rijmen, Francis Tuerlinckx, Michel Meulders, Dirk J. M.Smits, and Katalin Balαzs, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven
• Using hierarchical generalized linear model to model local item dependence by Hong Ji and Akihito Kamata, Florida State University
• The cross-classified multilevel measurement model: An explanation and demonstration by S. Natasha Beretvas, University of Texas at Austin and Jason L. Meyers, Pearson Educational Measurement

 

 

A list of chapter titles and authors for Rasch Measurement - Advanced and Specialaized Applications,with a convienent order form, is available in a printable pdf file. This file can be accessed by clicking on the highlighted RM: ASA Contents / Order Form below.

RM: ASA Contents / Order Form

 

Introduction to Rasch Measurement - edited by Everett Smith and Richard Smith - $59.00 Hard Cover (ISBN 0-9755351-0-2), $47.00 Soft Cover (ISBN 0-9755351-1-0)

2004 - 701 pages - This book is now available.
This edited volume is based on the Understanding Rasch Measurement series that appeared in the Journal of Applied Measurement.  Topics and authors include:
Rasch measurement a family of models
Analysis of fit
Metric development and score reporting
Analyzing dichotomous data
Analyzing rating scale data and optimization of categories
Analyzing partial credit data and pivot anchoring
Analyzing many-faceted data
Item banking and test equating
Item bias analysis
Standard setting
Rater effects in performance based-assessment
Best practice model for analyzing rating scale data
Computer adaptive testing
Rasch and additive conjoint measurement
Multi-dimensional random coefficients Rasch model
Reliability and validity
Choosing a model for measuring
Controversy and the Rasch model
Substantive scale construction
Detecting and evaluating the impact of multi-dimensionality
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Authors include:   David Andrich, Rita Bode, Derek Briggs, Peter Congdon,   Catherine Elder, Richard Gershon, George Karabatsos,  J. Michael Linacre, Tim McNamara, Magdalena Mok, Carol Myford, Randall Schumacker, Everett Smith,  Richard Smith, Mark Stone, Gregory Stone, Mark Wilson,  Edward Wolfe, and Benjamin Wright.

 

A list of chapter titles and authors for Introduction to Rasch Measurement ,with a convienent order form, is available in a printable pdf file. This file can be accessed by clicking on the highlighted IRM Contents / Order Form below.

IRM Contents / Order Form

The first chapter of Introduction to Rasch Measurement is available in a printable pdf file. This file can be accessed by clicking on the highlighted IRM Chapter 1 below.

IRM Chapter 1

Rasch Measurement in Health Sciences - edited by Nikolaus Bezruczko - $56 Hard Cover (ISBN 0-9755351-2-9) , $44 Soft Cover (ISBN 0-9755351-3-7)

2005 - 512 pages. This book is now available.
This edited volume explores diverse applications of Rasch measurement in the health sciences.   Topics and authors include:
• Measurement Theory Foundations, Nikolaus Bezruczko and Michael Linacre;
• Rasch Model Essentials, Nikolaus Bezruczko;
• Quality and Outcome Measures for Medical Rehabilitation, Carl V. Granger, Margaret Kelly Hayes, Mark Johnston, Anne Deutsch, Susan Braun, and Roger C. Fiedler;
• Refining a Measure of Brain Injury Sequelae: The Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory, James F. Malec, Anne M. Moessner, Miriam Kragness, and Muriel D. Lezak;
• Measuring Patient Satisfaction and Dissatisfaction, Elizabeth A. Hahn and David Cella;
• Measurement Consistency for Different Language Versions of Health-Related Quality-of-Life Instruments, Chih-Hung Chang, David Cella, and Benjamin D. Wright;
• Credentialing Health Care Professionals, Anne Wendt and Donna Surges Tatum;
Task Specificty and Case Dependency of Standardized Patient-Based Performance Assessments, Linjun Shen;
• Assessing Radiographic Status of Rheumatoid Arthritis: Introduction of a Shortened Erosion Scale, Frederick Wolfe, Dιsirιe DM van der Heijde, and Arvi Larsen;
• Using Rasch Measurement with Medical Data, Kyle Perkins, Benjamin D. Wright, and J. Kevin Dorsey;
• Rater Effects in Evaluation of Rheumatologic Disease Severity, Rita Bode, Marisa Klein-Gitelman, Toula Lechman,Eduardo Mendez, and Lauren M. Pachman;
• Representing Treatment Effects with Variable Maps, Everett Smith;
• The LIFEware System: Evaluating Functional Status of Multiple Sclerosis Patients, Carl V. Granger and Marsha Carlin;
• Several Non-Categorical Measures Define Air Polution Construct, Pedro Αlvarez;
• Equating Items from Two Osteoporosis Quality-of-Life Instruments, Xavier Badia Llach, Luis Prieto, Montserrat Roset, Adolfo Diez-Perez, and Michael Herdman;
• Measuring Change: Item Calibrations at Admission vs. Discharge, Larry Ludlow, Patricia L. Andres, and Stephen M. Hale;
• Comparison of MASQ and Beck Depression Inventory, Zhixiao Wang and Kendon Conrad;
• Dimensionality and Scaling Issues Measuring Activities of Daily Living (ADL), Weimo Zhu and Jae Kennedy;
• Fundamental Measurement for MEPS/CAHPS Quality-of-Care Scales, William P. Fisher, Jr. and George Karabatsos;
• Rasch Model Isolates Quality-of-Life Construct in Six WHOQOL-100 Data Sets, Emmanuel Ecosse, Alain Leplθge, and the WHOQOL Rasch group;
• Measurement in Health Research, Alan Tennant.

 

A list of chapter titles and authors for Rasch Measurement in Health Sciences ,with a convienent order form, is available in a printable pdf file. This file can be accessed by clicking on the highlighted RMHS Contents / Order Form below.

RMHS Contents / Order Form

A sample chapter from Rasch Measurement in Health Sciences is available in a printable pdf file. This file can be accessed by clicking on the highlighted RMHS Chapter below.

RMHS Chapter

Applications of Rasch Measurement in Science Education - edited by Xiufeng Liu, State University of New York, Buffalo and William Boone, Miami University (Ohio) - $ 63 Hard Cover (ISBN 1-934116-00-9), $51 Soft Cover (ISBN 1-934116-01-7)

2006 - 347 pages. This book is now available.
This edited book includes a collection of exemplary applications of Rasch models in science education. The chapters address important research questions related to assessing student conceptual understanding, informal science learning, learning environment, affective learning, and teacher knowledge. Topics and authors include:
• Forward by David F. Treagust, Curtin University of Technology
• Introduction to Rasch Measurement in Science Education by Xiufeng Liu, State University of New York, Buffalo, and William Boone, Miami Univeristy (Ohio)
• Constructing Quality Assessments through Rasch Techniques: The Process of Measurement, Feedback, Reflection, and Change by Kelly D. Bradley and Shannon O. Sampson, University of Kentucky
• The Geoscience Concept Inventory: Application of Rasch Analysis to Concept Inventory Development in Higher Education by Julie C. Libarkin, Ohio University, and Steven W. Anderson, Black Hills State University
• Tracking Cognitive Development with the Rasch Model by Lorna C. Endler, Gevirtz Graduate School of Education, UC Santa Barbara, and Trevor G. Bond, Hong Kong Institute of Education
• Stage-like Patterns in the Development of Conceptions of Energy by Theo L. Dawson, Hampshire College
• Exploring Conceptual Understandings of Diffusion and Osmosis by Senior High School and Undergraduate University Science Students by Debra Panizzon, University of New England, and Trevor Bond, Hong Kong Institute of Education
• Mapping out Students’ Matter Concept Development from Elementary to High School by Xiufeng Liu, State University of New York, Buffalo
• Using Structured Item Response Theory Models to Analyze Content and Inquiry Reasoning Skills in BioKids by Han Bao, University of Maryland, College Park, Amelia Gotwals, Nancy Butler Songer, University of Michigan, and Robert James Mislevy, University of Maryland, College Park
• Assessing Students’ Level of Knowledge and Analysing the Reasons for Learning Difficulties in Physics by Rasch Analysis by Alexander Kauertz and Hans E. Fischer, University of Duisburg-Essen, Germany
• Interpreting and Using Multidimensional Performance Data to Improve Learning in Science by Cathleen A. Kennedy and Karen Draney, University of California, Berkeley
• Is the Paper and Pencil Assessment Mode Appropriate for Assessing the Learning Outcomes of Primary Science?: Teachers’ Attitudes by Iris Chai Hong Lee, Murdoch University, and Guangzhong Luo, Hong Kong Examinations and Assessment Authority, Hong Kong
• Increasing Students’ Interest: Informal Learning in Authentic Science Labs by K. Engeln and Jurgen Rost, Leibniz-Institute for Science Education, Germany

 

 

A list of chapter titles and authors for Applications of Rasch Measurement in Science Education,with a convienent order form, is available in a printable pdf file. This file can be accessed by clicking on the highlighted ARMSE Contents / Order Form below.

ARMSE Contents / Order Form

Assessing and Modeling Cognitive Development in Schools: Intellectual Growth and Standard Setting - edited by Robert W. Lissitz - $69 Hard Cover (ISBN 978-1-934116-02-9), $57 Soft Cover (ISBN 978-1-934116-03-6)

2007 - 316 pages. This book is now available.
This edited volume is based on the very well received conference of the same name held on the University of Maryland campus on October 19 and 20, 2006. This book presents a series of papers that examine the area of cognitive modeling in assessment with a particular emphasis on standard setting. These papers present the most up to date information on modeling student learning using multivariate IRT models, progress variable mapping, value-based approaches, content trajectories, on line tutoring records, and vertically articulated performance standards. The No Child Left Behind (NCLB) legislation has encouraged a keen interest in standard setting. At the same time, there has been a steady increase in the use of cognitive models to understand student performance. These models are being used to characterize the patterns of problem solving that a student utilizes to solve the test items with which he or she is faced in an assessment. This book combines these two interests in a way that gives the reader an overview of the current literature as well as the issues that remain unresolved. This book helps one to understand the standard setting problem as one of characterizing the expert student’s problem solving strategies and differentiating these strategies from those used by the inexpert student. The result is a view of standard setting and student progress that takes on a very different appearance from that traditionally used in psychometrics. The titles and authors of the eleven chapters are as follows: 
• A Prospective, Progressive, and Predictive Approach to Standard Setting - Isaac I. Bejar, Henry I. Braun, and Richard J. Tannenbaum, Educational Testing Service;
• Vertically Articulated Performance Standards: An Exploratory Study of Inferences about Achievement and Growth - Steve Ferrara. Gary W. Phillips, Paul L. Williams, Steven Leinwand, Shannon Mahoney, and Stephan Ahad, American Institutes for Research ;
• Using On-line Tutoring Records to Predict End-of-Year Exam Scores: Experience with the ASSISTments Project and MCAS 8th Grade Mathematics - Brian W. Junker, Carnegie Mellon University;
• Non-Linear Unidimensional Scale Trajectories through Multidimensional Content Spaces: A Critical Examination of the Common Psychometric Claims of Unidimensionality, Linearity, and Interval-Level Measurement - Joseph A. Martineau, Michigan Department of Education; Dipendra Raj Subedi, Michigan State University; Kyle H. Ward, Michigan Department of Education; Tianli Li, Yang Lu, Qi Diao, Feng-Hsien Pang, Samuel Drake, Tian Song, Shu-Chuan Kao, Yan Zheng, and Xin Li, Michigan State University ;
• Item Response Theory and Longitudinal Modeling: The Real World is Less Complicated than We Fear - Marty McCall, and Carl Hauser, Northwest Evaluation Association;
• A Culture of Remembering: Contexts of Mathematical Development and their Implications for Assessment and Standard-Setting - Christopher A. Correa, and Kevin F. Miller, University of Michigan;
• Estimating Gain in Achievement when Content Specifications Change: A Multidimensional Item Response Theory Approach - Mark D. Reckase, Michigan State University, and Tianli Li, ACT, Inc.;
• Implementing Cognition-Based Learning Goals in Classrooms: The State Role - Mark Moody, Hillcrest and Main, Inc., William D. Schafer, University of Maryland, and Lani Seikaly, Hillcrest and Main, Inc.;
• A Value-Based Approach for Quantifying Student’s Scientific Problem Solving Efficiency and Effectiveness Within and Across Educational Systems - Ron Stevens, IMMEX Project, UCLA;
• Once You Know What They’ve Learned, What Do You Do Next? Designing Curriculum and Assessment for Growth - Dylan Wiliam, Institute of Education, University of London.
• Using Progress Variables to Map Intellectual Development - Cathleen A. Kennedy, and Mark Wilson, University of California, Berkeley.

 

A list of chapter titles and authors for Assessing and Modeling Cognitive Development in Schools, with a convienent order form, is available in a printable pdf file. This file can be accessed by clicking on the highlighted AMCDS Contents / Order Form below.

AMCDS Contents / Order Form

Longitudinal and Value Added Models of Student Performance - edited by Robert Lissitz - $69 Hard Cover (ISBN 0-9755351-8-8) , $57 Soft Cover (ISBN 0-9755351-9-6)

2006 - 511 pages. This book is now available.
This edited volume is based on the very well received conference of the same name held on the University of Maryland campus on November 7 and 8, 2005 The fourteen presentations have all been revised for the book, and most of the chapters include the questions and answers from the conference. This book presents a variety of chapters regarding the theory and application of Longitudinal (Growth) Models and Value Added determinations of Student Achievement. It is hoped that this book will be found to be stimulating to academics, psychometrics personnel, as well as to school practitioners who are concerned with the monitoring of student performance across time and the organization of schools to utilize this information to encourage maximizing student performance across time. Concerns include statistical theory, estimation issues, and a variety of approaches to modeling that have direct application to this school problem. NCLB has emphasized the status of Cross-sectional Cohorts through the analysis of AYP measures. This is one approach to the problem of measuring school performance. This book is concerned with alternatives that will permit schools to model the performance of individual students with the hope that all students might eventually have their performance maximized as they progress through the school experience. This goal requires the field to develop new ways to measure such progress and new ideas for the use of such measures by the schools. We hope that this book will contribute to the research base for this topic leading to applications that enhance the success of schools. Topics and Authors Include: 
• Using Value Tables to Explicitly Value Student Growth - Richard Hill, Brian Gong, Scott Marion and Charles De Pascale, Center for Assessment;
• Two Perspectives on the Development of Mathematical Competencies in Young Children: An Application of Continuous and Categorical Latent Variable Modeling - David Kaplan, Heidi M. Sweetman, University of Delaware;
• Growth Pathways as a Basis for AYP - Bill Schafer, University of Maryland and Jon S. Twing, Pearson Educational Measurement;
• Cross-Grade Scales in NAEP: Research and Real-Life Experience - Catherine A. McClellan, Lydia Gladkova, and Xueli Xu, Educational Testing Service;
• Measuring and Comparing Academic Progress Towards a Standard Using Bayesian Performance Profiles - Y. M. Thum, University of California Los Angeles;
• Longitudinal Modeling in Education: Standards-Based Applications, Technical Considerations, and Scaling up via Feasible Software - Harold Doran, American Institutes for Research;
• IRT Models for the Measurement of Change across Repeated Measurements - James Roberts, Georgia Institute of Technology, Qianli Ma, Yi Cao, and Yunyun Dai, University of Maryland;
• Options for Measuring Growth - Robert Smith and Wendy Yen, Educational Testing Service ;
• Issues in the Implementation of Longitudinal Growth Models for Student Achievement - Joseph Stevens, University of Oregon, and Keith Zvoch, University of Nevada at Las Vegas;
• Growth Models to Reform Policy and Practice: Do They Conflict? - Susan Rigney, U.S. Department of Education;
• Hybrid Growth Models for Estimating School Success: Theory and Application- Gage Kingsbury and Marty McCall, North West Educational Association.
• Measurement of Academic Growth of Individual Students Toward Variable and Meaningful Academic Standards - William Sanders, S. Paul Wright, and June C. Rivers, SAS Institute, Inc.;
• The (sometimes harsh) Reality of Longitudinal Student Achievement Modeling - J.R. Lockwood, Daniel F. McCaffrey, Laura Hamilton, and Brian Stecher, Rand Corporation;`
• Validating Achievement Gains in Cohort-to-Cohort and Growth-Based Modeling Contexts - Laura S. Hamilton, Daniel M. Koretz, and Daniel F. McCaffrey, Rand Corporation.

 

A list of chapter titles and authors for Longitudinal and Value Added Models of Student Performance, with a convienent order form, is available in a printable pdf file. This file can be accessed by clicking on the highlighted LVAM Contents / Order Form below.

LVAM Contents / Order Form

Value Added Models in Education: Theory and Applications - edited by Robert Lissitz - $49 Hard Cover (ISBN 0-9755351-4-5) , $39 Soft Cover (ISBN 0-9755351-5-3)

2005 - 319 pages. This book is now be available.
This edited volume is based on the very well received conference of the same name held on the University of Maryland campus on October 21 and 22, 2004 The ten presentations have all been revised for the book, and most of the chapters include the questions and answers from the conference. The editor tried to select authors who could represent a variety of experiences with Value Added Modeling (VAM). These included theoretical developments such as modeling the effects of test linking on growth analysis, what it means to do VAM applications in a valid way, what has been learned about VAM from applications in local school systems and from analyses of national and state data sets, and the application of VAM to important questions in education policy. These chapters are at the cutting edge of what we know about theory and about application in VAM. The titles and authors of the ten chapters are as follows: 
• Balancing Accountability and Improvement: Introducing Value-Added Models to a Large School System, Carol Schatz, Clare Von Secker, and Terry Alban, Montgomery County Public Schools;
• Value-added Modeling: What Does Due Diligence Require?, Henry Braun, Educational Testing Service;
• Value-Added Analysis of the Chicago Public Schools: An Application of Hierarchical Models, Steven Ponisciak, Consortium on Chicago School Research, and Anthony Bryk, Stanford University;
• The Confounding Effect of Linking Bias on Gains Estimated from Value-Added Models, Harold Doran, and Jon Cohen, American Institutes of Research;
• Challenges for Value-Added Assessment of Teacher Effects, Daniel McCaffrey, J.R. Lockwood, Louis T. Mariano, and Claude Setodji, The Rand Corporation;
• Value-Added Research: Right idea but Wrong Solution?, William Schmidt and Richard T. Houang, Michigan State University and Curtis C. McKnight, University of Oklahoma;
• The Study of School Effectiveness as a Problem in Research Design, Joe Stevens, University of New Mexico;
• Value-Added Assessment of Teacher Quality as an Alternative to the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards: What Recent Studies Say?, George Cunningham, University of Louisville and John Stone, East Tennessee State University;
• The Dallas School-Level Accountability Model: The Marriage of Status and Value-Added Approaches, William Webster, retired from the Dallas Independent School District,;
• Value-Added Assessment: Lessons from Tennessee, Dale Ballou, Vanderbilt University.

 

A list of chapter titles and authors for Value Added Models in Education ,with a convienent order form, is available in a printable pdf file. This file can be accessed by clicking on the highlighted VAM Contents / Order Form below.

VAM Contents / Order Form

 

Applications of Rasch Measurement - by Richard Smith - $25.00 Spiral bound

1992 - 200 pages
This book was designed as a text for an introductory course in Rasch measurement.  The book is divided into 9 chapters that roughly parallel a 15-week course in Rasch measurement.  Topics covered include:  Interpreting BIGSTEPS/ WINSTEPS output (dichotomous and rating scale), score reporting and interpretation, detecting item bias, item banking and test equating, investigating item structure, computer adaptive testing, simulation studies, Rasch vs. 1, 2, and 3-parameter logistic models.

Item and Person Analysis with the Rasch Model - by Richard Smith - $49.00 Spiral bound

1991 - 236 pages
IPARM is a DOS-based program that performs item and person analysis of dichotomous, rating scale and partial credit data.  The accompanying book explains how to run the program, provides detailed interpretation of a dichotomous and rating scale example and follows this with 4 chapters that explain the history, theory, computational formulas, Type I error rates, and powers of item and person analysis in the Rasch model.  One of the features of this program is the capacity to produce person score reports that show the relationship between item difficulty and person performance based on the common metric for items and persons that is available in Rasch measurement models.

Rasch Measurement Models - by Richard Smith - $12.00 Spiral bound

1999 - 70 pages
This book offers a brief introduction to Rasch measurement (10 pages) followed by a table-by-table interpretation of BIGSTEPS/WINSTEPS output (27 pages) and a table-by-table interpretation of FACETS output (20 pages).   Although the output tables for WINSTEPS and FACETS are continually evolving, this is an ideal primer for persons starting to learn how to interpret the output from these programs.

Journal of Applied Measurement

JAM back issues in hardcover library quality binding    
- Bound back issues: $151.00 institutions - $89.00 individuals    
2000 - Volume 1, 438 pages
2001 - Volume 2, 442 pages
2002 - Volume 3, 522 pages
2003 - Volume 4, 424 pages - Expanded 7x10 page format
Beginning in 2004, the cost of bound issues increased to $174 for institutions and $98 for individuals.
2004 - Volume 5, 451 pages - Expanded 7x10 page format
2005 - Volume 6, 461 pages - Expanded 7x10 page format
2006 - Volume 7, 482 pages - Expanded 7x10 page format
2007 - Volume 8, 459 pages - Expanded 7x10 page format
Beginning in 2008, the cost of bound issues increased to $196 for institutions and $108 for individuals.
2008 - Volume 9, 412 pages - Expanded 7x10 page format
2009 - Volume 10, 457 pages - Expanded 7x10 page format
2010 - Volume 11, 445 pages - Expanded 7x10 page format

Journal of Outcome Measurement - Bound back issues: $151.00 institutions - $89.00 individuals

JOM back issues in hardcover library quality binding    
1997 - Volume 1, 364 pages
1998 - Volume 2, 366 pages
1999 - Volume 3, 408 pages

UPCOMING BOOKS

 

There are currently no new books in development. But please check back as poposals are under consideration.

JAM / JAM PRESS ORDER FORM

 

An order form for the books listed above and back issues of the Journal of Applied Measurement, either bound or unbound, is available in a printable pdf file. This file can be accessed by clicking on the highlighted order form below.

Order Form

Please send orders to JAM Press, P.O. Box 1283, Maple Grove, MN 55311 USA

or e-mail orders to: info@jampress.org.

 

Fees are payable in US Dollars to Journal of Applied Measurement.

 

For customers outside of the United States and Canada, an electronic funds transfer (EFT) payment process is available. There is an additional EFT fee of $30 for each transaction. Please contact us for further details.

 

Credit card payments (VISA and MasterCard) are now accepted. Please see Order Form above for details.

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